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Be a better woman through stain removal

How to Clean Everything
Moore
[1978?]

Submitter: We just found this gem today in our reference collection.  Yes, it’s been weeded now.

Holly: And this is the third edition!  Wow, I think these entries speak for themselves.

0 Responses to Be a better woman through stain removal

  • i totally have to admit that i find this advice useful. seriously, if you are a housewife, its good to have a schedule.

    • Yes, the schedule section is quaintly put, but essentially correct.

    • Ahh, those long Wednesdays spent weaving asbestos into children’s garments, how I miss those days…

      I’m only jealous ’cause I’m not that organised.

      • Maybe you should have knitted them rather than weaved them, it might have been quicker 😀

  • Latex rubber girdles…there are a few “interesting” websites devoted to such items, I believe. Perhaps this book is more timely than you think.

    • LOL Matthew! Now I keep thinking of inappropriate remarks ….:)

    • We really need Beautiful Kind (I think that’s her username, it’s been so long since I’ve seen her about these parts I can’t quite remember it) to come in and comment on latex girdles.

      I couldn’t wear one. I’m allergic to latex.

  • Wow, that book was so valuable it couldn’t be taken from the room! That means the industrious housefrau needed to take copious notes.

  • I am still sitting tight and waiting for my schedule to come around to me. 35 years and counting…..!

  • Personal daintiness. Wow. Been a while since I’ve heard that expression.

  • Ahaha why would this be in the reference collection? And especially why would it STILL be in the reference collection.

  • If I ever want to learn how to clean a girdle made of asbestos, this is the book I’ll refer to!

  • Girdles with zippers! My grandma had those. Imagine the pain.
    But hey! I’ve been sitting tight waiting for the schedule to come around for years. I think it eluded me!

  • Is anyone else hearing Fran’s creepy landlord from “Black Books” saying, ‘see, there’s bad asbestos, and there’s NICE asbestos!’

  • I think my Nana had that book

  • Ha! I own this book. It was my mother’s and, despite the fact that it gathers dust, I feel like weeding it from my collection will be the final admission that she was a better housekeeper than I.

  • Are they suggesting one can clean asbestos? Yikes! Ah, the innocence of the 60’s and the 70’s.

  • The schedule’s not so bad. It’s better to spread the chores out than to have to do everything on one day.

  • But how will people know how to clean their asbestos dishtowels if you weed this?

    I guess it pays to look past the cover of a book because at first glance this looks like a great book to have in any library.

  • I would get an up to date copy of this book, handy to have. And actually, as a stay at home mom, I find that scheduling my cleaning has kept my house much tidier and I can keep up with it.

  • I do appreciate any advice I can get to achieve “personal daintiness.”

  • It’s not so much the schedule advice–it is good–as the seeming emphasis that the woman must NEVER slip up, and has to really plan the schedule extra hard…and must never, EVER displease the kids and especially the husband!

  • I have a copy of this fine book, which I rescued from the discards of a high school library. (Not the reference section, though.)

  • Reading a book like this could lead you to question your “personal daintiness.” Where does that fit in the schedule?

  • I love the term “personal daintiness.” I am going to try to work it into as many of my conversations as possible in the future.

  • I have a copy of this book, although it’s the 1984 edition! When I inherited my grandmother’s books it was mixed in with the cookbooks. I kept it for the kitsch factor, but perhaps I should read the girdle section closer…

  • She has a point about foundation funk!

  • I do work hard at maintaining personal daintiness.

  • This reminds me of the newly-hired reference librarian in a northern Minnesota community.

    She continued the phone reference interview by asking…
    “What exactly did you spill on the duck?”

  • Charlemagne had a tablecloth woven out of asbestos. After a feast, he used to wow guests by throwing the tablecloth into the fire. He’d then pull it out and shake it off, and it was clean of all the spilled food, because the food burnt off, but the asbestos remained unburnt.

  • The author’s middle name says it all.

  • I wonder if there is anything in their that would have helped Monica Lewinsky’s stain problem

  • My house is actually shingled in asbestos. Ahh, the 40s.

    I like the implication that a housekeeping schedule will make your husband more pleasant. Does that work if he’s fundamentally unpleasant to begin with? Perhaps I can get some of my coworker’s spouses on this plan…?