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Mary Kelly

Jesus loves puppets

puppets go to church

Puppets Go To Church
Perry and Perry
1975

Puppets, clowns, and mimes are my personal trifecta of evil. However, when one is in charge of collection development at a library, it is essential to set aside one’s personal issues with respect to puppets, mimes, and clowns and recognize that others love this stuff. Personally, since these puppets are on a mission from God, I am even more disturbed. But I digress.

This is less about puppet craft and more about performance and integrating Gospel themes into modern lessons. This would be a decent choice for some Christian school and church libraries if it were the mid to late 1970s. The scripts seem a bit dated and in one skit there is a reference to being spanked by someone’s mother, which would make it questionable for some libraries.

Mary

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Atomic Bomb 101

how to build an atomic bomb cover

How to make an atomic bomb in your own kitchen (well, practically)
Bale
1951

I know all you science nerds are looking for new recipes. How about an atomic bomb? Published in the early 1950s, this is a simple explanation about atomic energy. Written is a light tone, this book is for complete novices trying to wrap their brain about the new world of atomic energy.

Although I couldn’t find out much about Bob Bale other than what was included on the book, he is not a scientist. He was a motivational speaker and sales consultant. Not sure that it qualifies him as a science author, but it did make it quite readable.

 

Mary

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Lady Soldiers

careers for women in uniform

Careers for Women in Uniform
Heiman and Myers
1971

Everyone knows I have a particular issue with career books. This one is particularly interesting as it is all about recruiting women into the the armed forces. Considering the year this was published, I wonder how many women they actually were able to recruit, given anti-war sentiment at the time. I have to laugh at the author’s attempt to make the military appealing to women by constantly talking about how great the uniforms look. Every other page seemed to say “come join the army and wear a cute uniform.”  Even in 1971, this is a pretty ridiculous strategy for attracting women.

Evidently, this book is all about selling the military to women using clothes, parties, and fun. I keep thinking they are leaving out a few things.

Mary

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