expectant fathers

Time to be a Daddy

Expectant Fathers
Bittman and Zalk
1978

Even in the late 1970s, dads were not always allowed to be a part of the birth process. Consider this a sensitive man’s guide to sharing the pregnancy experience. Lots of feels for everyone. There is very little specific childcare or pregnancy advice. This is more about including the dads. Good choice for the late 1970s, but out of place in today’s culture.

Mary

how the doctor knows you're fine

A Doctor Visit for the Kids

How the doctor knows you’re  fine
Cobb
1973

I’m not a fan of this title. The illustrations are giving me the creeps. Take a look at the last picture and then tell me you want to go get all your vaccinations updated. The details are kind of bothersome as well. I don’t think well visits will be as naked as this book indicates. I think they would happily give anyone a gown or some kind of covering.

crafts for the elderly

Crafting for the Senior Set

Crafts for the Elderly
Gould and Gould
1971

This book is probably the worst book ever for learning a craft. I understand that this was written for eldercare staff on creating some recreational projects. However, there are practically no pictures, the print is small, and the projects are kind of dumb.

I can appreciate the idea of crafting or any kind of programming for folks that have limited mobility issues, but this book is not necessarily the answer.

Dyslexia

Dyslexia

Dyslexia
The Problem of Reading Retardation
Hepworth
1971

Reading and learning to read are fascinating subjects. Holly and I both had undergraduate degrees in education and we have quite a few lively discussions on techniques and child development. We have come a long way in understanding how the developing child learns to read. For the most part, teachers during my time were breaking students into 2 groups: regular and special: there was no room for nuance. Toward the end of the 1980s and in the 1990s, there was real progress in diagnosis and treatment of dyslexia. In addition, accommodation to students with learning issues were very much a part of mainstream schooling.

Hello Mr. Chips cover

A-Diskette A-Daskette

Hello, Mr. Chips!
Bishop
1982

Submitter: I think this was probably a fantastic middle school book in 1982. What makes it awful now is that my students have never even heard of the terms that make up the punchlines. Also, the illustrations of computers with massive CPUs and pin-feed printers are unrecognizable to our students. My favorite joke requires knowledge of both old pop culture and obsolete technology: “What’s a computer’s favorite Ella Fitzgerald number? A-Diskette, A-Daskette.” I just read it to a group of 8th grade boys and received only blank stares.